Climate Resilience Toolkit Publishes New Case Study on Heat Illness Early Warning in the Carolinas 16 March 2018

Climate Resilience Toolkit Publishes New Case Study on Heat Illness Early Warning in the Carolinas

Developing an Early Warning System to Prevent Heat Illness

Residents of the Carolinas are familiar with hot summers, but in some areas excessive heat events bring a higher risk for heat-related illness—and even death. A new tool can help local communities get ahead of heat events so they can reduce risk for their residents.

Protecting Outdoor Workers from Extreme Heat 6 June 2017

Protecting Outdoor Workers from Extreme Heat

NOAA and OSHA data combined to understand heat exposure for outdoor workers

Many outdoor workers get uncomfortably warm during the hot days of summer. As employers are responsible for providing a safe workplace, they need to know when uncomfortable becomes unhealthy.

Predictions for the summer of 2017 show most of the contiguous United States has elevated chances for warmer-than-average temperatures. The summer outlook map and other forecasts in this Web app can help outdoor workers and their supervisors understand heat hazards, keep workers safe and productive, and even save lives.

NOAA Releases Summer Climate Outlook for 2017 6 June 2017

NOAA Releases Summer Climate Outlook for 2017

only the great plains may be spared from above average temperatures

Schools are letting out, Memorial Day is nearly here, and for many Americans that means  the unofficial start of summer. And if it's summer, then it 's time to start paying attention to the risk of extreme heat. According to NOAA’s summer outlook, most of the United States is favored to have a hotter than average summer in 2017. Only in the Great Plains do forecasters think the chances for a cool or a normal summer are equal to the chances of a hot summer. Everywhere else—from Alaska to southern California, and from Maine to Texas—odds are tilted toward well above average warmth. The absolute highest chances for a much warmer than usual summer are in Hawaii. (see the large version of the map below for Hawaii and Alaska.

New Case Study: Protecting People from Sweltering City Summers 16 May 2017

New Case Study: Protecting People from Sweltering City Summers

Climate models predict an increase in the frequency, severity, and length of heat waves in coming decades. Federal, state, and local agencies are working to provide more advanced warnings and services to help health care workers, social services providers, and the general public better prepare for and respond to extreme heat events.

Report: First Regional NIHHIS Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Workshop in El Paso, TX 28 February 2017

Report: First Regional NIHHIS Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Workshop in El Paso, TX

An executive summary of the National Integrated Heat Health Information System workshop in July, 2016 outlines outcomes and recommendations for different aspects of heat health resilience in the El Paso-Juárez-Las Cruces Region.

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2017, the United States experienced a record-tying 16 climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 362 lives, and had significant economic effects on the areas impacted, costing more than $306 billion. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

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