New Maps & Data section on Climate.gov offers easy-to-understand maps and entry-level information on climate data

  • 6 April 2015
  • Number of views: 5096

People who are interested in climate have a new source of maps and data on NOAA Climate.gov. The recently updated page at Climate.gov/maps-data offers easy-to-understand climate maps, a visual catalog of popular climate products, and instructional pages that cover the fundamentals of measuring climate variables and processing and using climate data.

A new map feature, Data Snapshots, offers ten sets of reusable climate maps, available for download in formats for Web, print, and broadcast TV. Snapshots are specially prepared versions of existing NOAA data products; each map is designed to be visually appealing and easy to understand by a broad audience. Clear descriptions tell what each map shows and what measurements were used to make it.

The new Dataset Gallery offers simplified access to many of NOAA’s most sought-after climate data products. Descriptive names and images of sample output enable easy browsing, while convenient filtering options can help users zero in on datasets of interest. Clear overviews of each dataset describe what the data show and how they were gathered. “How-to” text provides tips for accessing each type of data and exploration ideas users may want to consider.

People who are new to climate data can learn some of the basic concepts underlying its collection, processing, and use in the Climate Data Primer. This new feature provides instructional text and images to describe how daily observations can eventually become climate data, and how and why people use such data to help them make decisions.

The new Maps and Data section aims to encourage people of all ages to explore climate data, and to help new and novice data users become familiar with how we monitor climate and what climate data tell us.

“You don’t have to be a scientist to understand climate data,” said Betsy Youngman, an educational consultant who contributed to the Maps and Data update. “Anyone with an Internet connection can tap into the archives of climate data that have been collected around the world. They can interpret it for themselves to check the status of our planet.”

NOAA Climate.gov provides scientific data and information to help promote a climate-smart nation. Americans’ health, security, and economic well-being are closely linked to climate and weather. People want and need information to help them manage their climate-related risks and opportunities.  

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and our other social media channels.

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2017, the United States experienced a record-tying 16 climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 362 lives, and had significant economic effects on the areas impacted, costing more than $306 billion. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

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