A Cooperative Agreement for Climate Adaptation and Mitigation FY21 Funding Opportunity

Federal Agency Name(s): Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce

Notice of Funding Opportunity Title: A Cooperative Agreement for Climate Adaptation and Mitigation Competition, FY2021

Announcement Type: Initial

Notice of Funding Opportunity Number: NOAA-OAR-CPO-2021-2006841

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 11.431, Climate and Atmospheric Research

The NOAA Climate Adaptation and Mitigation Program (CAMP) supports research, programs, projects and other activities related to NOAA’s mission, primarily through collaborations among scientists and professionals in areas of mutual interest across the full spectrum of NOAA climate sciences. This cooperative agreement will focus on the following four priority areas: 1) Improved scientific understanding of the changing climate system and its impacts; 2) Scientific assessments of current and future states of the climate system that identify potential impacts and inform science, service, and stewardship decisions; 3) Mitigation and adaptation efforts supported by sustained, reliable, and timely climate services; 4) A climate-literate public that understands its vulnerabilities to a changing climate and makes informed decisions.

Eligible applicants must be academic institutions of higher learning which offer doctoral degrees in NOAA-related sciences; consortia of academic institutions of higher learning which offer doctoral degrees in NOAA-related sciences; or non-profit research institutions. Multi-institution applications will not be accepted.

The total NOAA funding amount available for the CAMP is anticipated to be approximately $10,000,000 per year or a total of $50,000,000 for the five-year period. There will be appropriation of some funds at the start of the award. NOAA anticipates making one award for the five-year period and anticipates providing funds one or more times each year for five years. NOAA has no obligation to provide additional funding in connection with that award in subsequent years. Funding for each subsequent year of a multi-year proposal is at the discretion of NOAA and is subject to the availability of funds.

NOAA, OAR, and the Climate Program Office (CPO) encourage applicants and awardees to support the principles of diversity and inclusion when writing their proposals and performing their work. Diversity is defined as a collection of individual attributes that together help organizations achieve objectives. Inclusion is defined as a culture that connects each employee to the organization. Promoting diversity and inclusion improves creativity, productivity, and the vitality of the climate research community in which NOAA engages.

This information, along with the name and contact information for the Competition Manager, is provided below.

 

Competition

Open to view competition details, information sheets, and contact information.

NOFO at a Glance

 

Links to Full NOFO and Grants.gov Listing

Important Dates/Deadlines

Full Applications

Full applications for this competition must be received by 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time, May 24, 2021.

Applications received after these dates and times will not be considered for funding.

Applications must be submitted via grants.gov. For applications submitted through grants.gov, the basis for determining timeliness is the receipt notice issued by grants.gov, which includes the date and time received.

Applicants without internet access

Please contact the CPO Grants Manager Diane Brown by mail at NOAA Climate Program Office (R/CP1), SSMC3, Room 12734, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910 to obtain an application package. Please allow two weeks after receipt for a response. Hard copy submissions will be date and time stamped when they are received in the Climate Program Office.

Emailed or faxed copies of applications will not be accepted.

Where to Submit

Application packages:

Visit Grants.gov and click on Apply for Grants. You may also directly view the Grants.gov listing.

Notice of Funding Opportunity Number:

NOAA-OAR-CPO-2021-2006841

Applicants without Internet access:

Please send mail to:
Diane S. Brown
CPO Grants Manager
NOAA Climate Program Office (R/CP1), SSMC3, Room 12734
1315 East-West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910

Please allow two weeks after receipt for a response.

Questions/Who to Contact

 

Neil Christerson, NOAA Program Officer   

 

Funding Opportunities Home

 

RISA FY2022 Funding Opportunities

 

CPO 2022 Funding Opportunities

 

Applicant Resources at a Glance

About CPO Funding Opportunities

CPO manages competitive research programs through which NOAA funds high-priority climate science, assessments, decision support research, outreach, education, and capacity building activities designed to advance the understanding of Earth’s climate system and to foster the application for of this knowledge to enable effective decisions. CPO supports research that is conducted across the United States and internationally. CPO also provides strategic guidance for the agency’s climate science and services programs and supports NOAA’s contributions to the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and its National Climate Assessment and similar international endeavors.

FAQ

 

Funding Recipients

IMPORTANT DATES CALENDAR

Competition 1: A Cooperative Agreement for Climate Adaptation and Mitigation

Competition Number: ?
 

Manager(s):
Neil Christerson

Program Priorities

As part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) climate portfolio within the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), the Climate Program Office (CPO) addresses climate challenges by supporting climate research, observations, monitoring, modeling, assessments, interdisciplinary decision-support research, outreach, education, and partnership development.  The Climate Program Office cannot fulfill this vision alone and the recipient is expected to possess unique capabilities to address the following four priority areas. 

  1. Improved scientific understanding of the changing climate system and its impacts. The need to advance understanding of the climate system and climate impacts, improve climate predictions and projections, and better inform adaptation and mitigation strategies is urgent. Key scientific uncertainties limit scientists' ability to understand and predict changes in the climate system. This is particularly true for monthly-to-decadal timescales and at the regional and local levels for which scales are highly relevant to planning and decision making. Research on the connections between weather and climate, for instance, is necessary to understand how a changing climate may affect precipitation patterns and severe weather events, including hurricanes. On decadal-to-centennial timescales, research is needed to understand feedback between atmospheric greenhouse gases and the rate of global-to-regional climate impacts, such as changes in sea level, heat waves, droughts, and air and water quality. Adaptation and mitigation strategies must be informed by a solid scientific understanding of the climate system. Research is required to understand how changes in the global ocean circulation affect the climate system and their subsequent impacts on coastal regions, including sea level rise, ocean acidification, and living marine resources.
  2. Scientific assessments of current and future states of the climate system that identify potential impacts and inform science, service, and stewardship decisions. Stakeholders and the general public need a clear understanding of the best available science that describes the state of the climate and the likely impacts of climate change.  Scientific assessments at the global, national, regional, and local levels integrate knowledge from many disciplines to provide decision makers with authoritative information on climate impacts, identify gaps in understanding, and help prioritize future research and development efforts to fill those gaps. When pursued on a sustained basis, assessments build relationships between researchers and users that are critical for communities and governments to take action.
  3. Mitigation and adaptation efforts supported by sustained, reliable, and timely climate services. Human-induced changes in Earth's climate, as well as natural climate variability, complicate the ability to effectively plan for the future, manage resources, support national and food security, meet international and other intergovernmental agreements, and sustainably develop the economy. Resource managers, Governments, public and private businesses and organizations recognize that a changing climate complicates their ability to achieve their goals. Existing information is not readily available to those who need it or formatted in a way that makes it easy to use. The Nation needs a comprehensive, authoritative, and coordinated source of climate information to support adaptation and mitigation strategies and to incorporate into related decision-making processes. 
  4. A climate-literate public that understands its vulnerabilities to a changing climate and makes informed decisions. The success or failure of climate adaptation and mitigation in the United States and around the world will depend on the ability of leaders, organizations, institutions, and the public to understand the challenges and opportunities climate change presents. The routine incorporation of climate information into decisions requires an awareness of how a changing climate may affect individuals, families, businesses, and communities. A society educated about climate change and actively engaged in dialogue about its causes and effects will better address today's problems and plan for tomorrow. 


CPO HEADQUARTERS

1315 East-West Highway Suite 100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

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Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather.