Climate Program Office News

Global rainfall pattern could offer prediction skill three weeks out 19 January 2018

Global rainfall pattern could offer prediction skill three weeks out

A new study says that teleconnections with certain phases of a recurring tropical rainfall pattern could extend predictions up to 20-25 days in advance. The authors’ findings provide guidance on which tropical conditions might lead to improved forecasts beyond our current capability – and more time to prepare for extreme events.

UPDATED: FY18 Federal Funding Opportunities for Climate and Societal Interactions 17 January 2018

UPDATED: FY18 Federal Funding Opportunities for Climate and Societal Interactions

The three competitions would fund interdisciplinary research on planning and preparedness to extreme weather and climate.
Seismic sensors record hurricane intensity, study finds 8 January 2018

Seismic sensors record hurricane intensity, study finds

New line of information could help predict the storms’ future strength

A new study has found that seemingly trivial vibrations in the earth's surface can actually encode the power of hurricanes moving over ocean waters. The findings may make it possible to estimate the strength of past hurricanes, to reveal long term changes in the severity and frequency of these storms, and help scientists understand potential future changes.

Water Resources Dashboard: November Webinar Recordings 19 December 2017

Water Resources Dashboard: November Webinar Recordings

Missed November's webinars? Watch them here.
What’s the criteria for identifying flash droughts? New study says rapid onset, not short duration 13 December 2017

What’s the criteria for identifying flash droughts? New study says rapid onset, not short duration

“Flash drought” has become a popular term in the media, but the debate of what a flash drought really is has caused confusion that affects scientists’ ability to detect their onset, monitor their development, and understand how they evolve.

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About the Climate Program Office

The Climate Program Office (CPO) manages competitive research programs in which NOAA funds high-priority climate science, assessments, decision support research, outreach, education, and capacity-building activities designed to advance our understanding of Earth’s climate system, and to foster the application of this knowledge in risk management and adaptation efforts.  CPO-supported research is conducted in regions across the United States, at national and international scales, and globally.  Learn more...

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ABOUT OUR ORGANIZATION

Americans’ health, security and economic wellbeing are tied to climate and weather. Every day, we see communities grappling with environmental challenges due to unusual or extreme events related to climate and weather. In 2011, the United States experienced a record high number (14) of climate- and weather-related disasters where overall costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Combined, these events claimed 670 lives, caused more than 6,000 injuries, and cost $55 billion in damages. Businesses, policy leaders, resource managers and citizens are increasingly asking for information to help them address such challenges.

CONTACT US

Climate Program Office
1315 East-West Hwy, Suite 1100
Silver Spring, MD 20910

CPO.webmaster@noaa.gov