MAPP Newsletter: Winter 2016 Issue 29 January 2016

MAPP Newsletter: Winter 2016 Issue

This is the Winter 2016 edition and the 4th issue of our quarterly newsletter highlighting major papers, events, and press releases related to MAPP-funded work. Highlights include research into drought understanding and prediction over the Central U.S., improving seasonal forecasts of tropical cyclone activity, the completion of the Climate Forecast System Version 2 archive, and an OAR technical report that informs development of next-generation NOAA climate reanalysis. View the newsletter for much more information.

Improving Seasonal Forecasts of Tropical Cyclone Activity 4 January 2016

Improving Seasonal Forecasts of Tropical Cyclone Activity

Tropical cyclones are one of the biggest natural threats to society, causing substantial economic damage and loss of life annually. Accurate and reliable seasonal predictions of tropical cyclone activity are essential for disaster preparedness, but remain challenging for climate scientists. In a new MAPP-supported study, Manganello et al.
indicates that the potential for high-resolution coupled (atmosphere-ocean) modeling to improve seasonal forecasting of tropical cyclone activity may be greater than previously believed.

Sea level feedback lowers projections of future Antarctic Ice-Sheet mass loss, says CPO-funded research 1 December 2015

Sea level feedback lowers projections of future Antarctic Ice-Sheet mass loss, says CPO-funded research

Research supported by CPO’s MAPP and CVP programs evaluated the influence of the feedback mechanism between sea-level fall and ice sheets on future AIS retreat on centennial and millennial timescales for different emission scenarios, using a coupled ice sheet-sea-level model.
Novel data science approaches could drive advances in seasonal to sub-seasonal predictions of precipitation 25 November 2015

Novel data science approaches could drive advances in seasonal to sub-seasonal predictions of precipitation

Predictions at the seasonal to sub-seasonal scale are important for planning and decision-making in a variety of disciplines, and improving understanding and model skill at this timescale is a key research priority. An as yet underexplored approach to sub-seasonal prediction using data science and graph theory methods that are increasingly common to other fields outside of meteorology and climate science shows potential to improve predictions at this challenging timescale.

New MAPP-funded research assesses how changes in the tropical belt affect climate variability 21 October 2015

New MAPP-funded research assesses how changes in the tropical belt affect climate variability

New research funded by CPO’s Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program resulted in a paper titled “Southward Shift of the Northern Tropical Belt from 1945 to 1980,” recently published in Nature Geoscience.
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