Science needs for sea level adaptation planning 19 October 2015

Science needs for sea level adaptation planning

A new paper by Lindeman et. al—supported by the Climate Program Office—performed a synthesis of science needs from coastal communities by reporting on workshops held in Florida, North Carolina, and Massachusetts. The paper, “Science Needs for Sea-Level Adaptation Planning: Comparisons among Three U.S. Atlantic Coastal Regions,” was published online in the journal of Coastal Management on October 14, 2015.

Comparing Two Generations of Climate Model Simulations and Projections of Regional Climate Processes for North America 9 October 2015

Comparing Two Generations of Climate Model Simulations and Projections of Regional Climate Processes for North America

A technical report produced by the NOAA CMIP5 Task Force analyzes how CMIP5--the latest generation of climate model simulations--compares to CMIP3 simulations and projections of regional climate processes for North America.

Assessing flood hazards on the U.S. East Coast considering sea level rise and tropical cyclone activity 5 October 2015

Assessing flood hazards on the U.S. East Coast considering sea level rise and tropical cyclone activity

A new study published in Nature Climate Change on Sept. 21, 2015, and supported by NOAA’s Climate Program Office employs a unique approach to assess flood risk by combining consideration of oceanographic sea level rise (SLR) and tropical cyclone intensity, frequency and duration into a flood index.

El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Sea Level Pressure Anomalies in the Western Pacific 17 September 2015

El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Sea Level Pressure Anomalies in the Western Pacific

Research supported by NOAA CPO’s Climate Variability and Predictability (CVP) program and the Modeling, Analysis, Predictions and Projections (MAPP) program has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Climate.

How has the concurrence of drought and heatwaves in the U.S. changed over time? 9 September 2015

How has the concurrence of drought and heatwaves in the U.S. changed over time?

Research by Omid Mazdiyasni and Amir AghaKouchak (University of California, Irvine) titled, "Substantial increase in concurrent droughts and heatwaves in the United States" was recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). 
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