Improving model representation of glacial isostatic adjustment for better sea level predictions

  • 23 March 2015
  • Number of views: 2667
 Improving model representation of glacial isostatic adjustment for better sea level predictions

Research supported by NOAA's Climate Program Office was accepted for publication in Geophysical Journal International on Feb. 9, 2015.

"Glacial isostatic adjustment, relative sea level history and mantle viscosity: reconciling relative sea level model predictions for the U.S. East coast with geological constraints" explores the ability of models to correctly simulate the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) - the rebound of land masses which were previously compressed under large ice sheets.

Using relative sea level histories, the authors show that a new mantle viscosity model (VM6) improves upon previous versions in simulating this process. Understanding GIA as it occurred in the past is crucial to understanding how the present-day retreat of existing glaciers and ice sheets at the poles will affect global and regional sea level.

To access the full paper, visit: http://gji.oxfordjournals.org/content/201/2/1156.abstract

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