The evolution of the in situ global ocean observing system for climate

  • 1 June 2015
  • Number of views: 2638

A paper in the Marine Technology Society Journal, authored by Stephen R. Piotrowicz and David Legler of CPO’s Climate Observation Division (COD), describes the eight elements of Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and the Arctic Observing Network. GOOS is the international observation system that ensures long-term sustained ocean observations. The ocean equivalent of the atmospheric observing system supporting weather forecasting, GOOS, was originally developed to provide data for weather and climate applications. Today, GOOS data are used for all aspects of ocean management as well as weather and climate research and forecasting. 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), through the Climate Observation Division of the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research/Climate Program Office, is a major supporter of the climate component of GOOS. The paper addresses the evolution of the observing system as rapidly evolving new capabilities in sensors, platforms, and telecommunications allow observations at unprecedented temporal and spatial scales with the accuracy and precision required to address questions of climate variability and change.

To learn more, access the full paper online (pdf). Copyright 2015. Marine Technology Society Journal. 

This article is for personal use only, and is not to be distributed in any format. The Marine Technology Society is a not-for-profit, international, professional association. Founded in 1963, the Society believes that the advancement of marine technology and the productive, sustainable use of the oceans depend upon the active exchange of ideas between government, industry and academia. See www.mtsociety.org.

Citation

The In Situ Global Ocean Observing System for Climate (and Other Needs), Stephen R. Piotrowicz & David M. Legler. Marine Technology Society Journal, March/April 2015, Volume 49, Number 2, pp. 112–121.

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