CVP News

CPO Staff Members to represent NOAA at UNCCC in Lima, Peru

  • 1 December 2014
  • Number of views: 3211

Members of NOAA's Climate Program Office are slated to attend the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru from December 1-12, 2014.  

The Conference will include concurrent sessions of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol, the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice, the Subsidiary Body for Implementation, the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Kyoto Protocol, and the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action.  

Amanda McCarty will participate as a member of the U.S. delegation representing NOAA and the U.S. government on adaptation, research, and systematic observation issues. 

Additionally, several NOAA employees (V. Ramaswamy, Libby Jewett, Doug Marcy, Wasilla Thiaw, Wayne Higgins, David Herring, and Amanda McCarty) will participate as presenters in the U.S. Center, a major public outreach initiative of the U.S. hosted by the Department of State to inform audiences at the meeting and through the web on some of the outstanding work the U.S. government supports to address climate change. 

The schedule of events, including links for webstreaming of select events, can be accessed at: http://uscenter.tumblr.com/schedule

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